Week of May 1 in Teacher Ed News

| May 5, 2017

INTERNATIONAL
IEN. Improving education in and out of school in South Africawidespread need for books, textbooks curricula, and other basic materials and about the need to rely on volunteers, parents, community members and students themselves because well-trained teachers were not available.

Latvijas Sabiedriskie Mediji. Riga Teacher Training and Educational Management Academy will be shut down on October 1, 2017

New Internationalist. PISA-envy, Pearson and Starbucks-style schools. A scripted curriculum, providing instructions for and explanations of what teachers should do and say during any given moment of a class, is delivered through tablets synchronized with BIA [Bridge] headquarters

Royal Society of the encouragement of Arts. What would Benjamin Franklin say to Wendy Kopp? After leading Teach For America’s growth and development for 24 years, in 2013, Wendy transitioned out of the role of CEO. In Wendy’s acceptance of the medal she asked what Benjamin Franklin would make of today’s world.

UNITED STATES
AACTE.
1) Congress Reaches Deal on Omnibus Spending Bill The Teacher Quality Partnership grants and the Special Education Personnel Preparation program are flat-funded. Title II-A of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), the School Leader Recruitment and Support Grants, and the overall budget for the Institute of Education Sciences are reduced.
2) Final edTPA submission date for 2016-17 is August 17th. The 2017-2018 edTPA handbooks include no across-the-board changes and only minor changes for six fields—see http://edtpa.aacte.org/ [login required]. See edTPA.com for 2017-18 submission and reporting dates.

AERA/CAEP. Call for Manuscripts. Linking Teacher Preparation Program Design and Implementation to Outcomes for Teachers and Students

EdWeek.
1) Budget Deal for 2017 Includes Increases for Title I, Special Education However, Title II grants for teacher development would be cut by $294 million, down to about $2.1 billion for the rest of fiscal 2017.
2) Planning a Demo Lesson: Critical Thinking Is Key
3) Preschool Teachers Get a Boost in Teaching Early Math But while math experts have agreed that young children should get high-quality math instruction, little has changed in the professional lives of early-childhood educators
4) Teacher Turnover in Alaska is Costing the State $20 Million Annually University of Alaska President Jim Johnsen has made preparing more educators for the state’s classrooms a top priority.
5) Tiny New Mexico District Looks to End Master’s Degree Requirement for Teachers  … four states—Connecticut, Kentucky, Maryland, and New York—require teachers to earn a master’s degree for license advancement. But NCTQ is against such requirements.

Hechinger Report. What’s wrong with white teachers?: Closing the performance gap between black and white teachers means talking about racism

National Council for the Advancement of Educator Ethics (NCAEE). Ethics Survey [May 15 deadline]

NYTimes. School Vouchers Aren’t Working, but Choice Is On one side of the caricature are defenders of traditional public schools, who believe in generous funding, small class sizes and teacher training. On the other are so-called reformers, who believe in vouchers, charter schools and standardized tests.

The Atlantic.
1) How Central Park Could Fix Public Education Higher salaries can help retain effective teachers and lure smart people with an aptitude for instruction away from other jobs, but research points to an even more effective strategy: enhancing the social status of public-school teachers. “What we need,” says Smith’s colleague, Rabin, “is for teachers to be considered scholars.”
2) How Does Race Affect a Student’s Math Education? According to Battey, there are ways in which math teachers, math educators, and math researchers “are perpetuating racism in schools”—which is shaping the expectations, interactions, and kinds of mathematics that students experience.

THE Journal. First-Year Teachers More Confident in Tech but Use It Less Than Experienced Teachers

TheStarPress. Partnerships improve education opportunities In 2009, Ball State’s Teachers College designed an experimental immersive learning program for future elementary educators.

WashingtonPost.
1) Congressional budget deal wards off Trump’s wish list of higher-education cuts
2) James Meredith: This is what Martin Luther King Jr. would tell school ‘reformers’ Today, President Donald Trump and Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos are attempting to improve our schools with “school choice,” vouchers, charter schools, cyber-charters, privatization, putting uncertified “temp teachers” with six weeks training into our highest-needs schools…
3) Under pressure to contain tuition, colleges scramble for other revenue Beacon College [FL]… also signed a contract with the United Arab Emirates under which it will be paid to train teachers there.

NEW YORK STATE
NYSED.
1) Notice of Proposed Rule Making was published in the New York State Register on March 29, 2017. NYSED will accept comments on the proposed teacher certification amendments until May 15. Send comments to regcomments@nysed.gov (link sends e-mail).
2) Proposed Amendment to Add a New Section 80-5.23 to the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education to Establish a Residency Certificate for Students Enrolled in a Classroom Academy Residency Pilot Program.
3) State Education Department Announces 13 Public Meetings To Be Held To Receive Comment On Draft Every Student Succeeds Act Plan

PoliticoNewYork. Excelsior Effect: Restrictions dramatically cut eligibility for free tuition

NEW YORK CITY
NYTimes.
1) Chancellor Praises de Blasio’s Education Gains as Debate to Control Schools Nears “He’s not in any way radical with his reforms,” Priscilla Wohlstetter, a distinguished research professor at Columbia University’s Teachers College, said of Mr. de Blasio. “It’s all been fairly incremental given the national scene.”
2) Sometimes the Birds and the Bees Get Short Shrift in School of more than 15,000 instructors who taught health in the city last year, only 153 were licensed in health. (About 12,000 were elementary schoolteachers, who typically teach multiple subjects and are unlikely to be licensed in health.)