Week of Dec. 18 in Teacher Ed News

| December 22, 2017

NOTE: Teacher Ed News will resume the week of Jan. 1, 2018

GLOBAL
Education Week.
A Novel Way to Improve Teacher Prep: Give Teachers Better Curriculum  …countries like Singapore and Finland tend to base all of their preparation around vetted, high-quality curriculum in a way that the United States and other countries, like Australia, do not.

Premier Pathways. Budget 2017: £100m National Centre for Computing to train 8,000 new teachers

RNZ. National standards ditched by government  It said the government was also stopping the transfer of responsibility for teachers’ professional development courses and training to the Education Council. The paper said the Education Minister wanted to consider instead the development of a national advisory service to oversee all centrally-funded training.

Study International. Why AI could be the ultimate education enhancer  No longer will teacher numbers rely on people choosing to train for years, no longer will poor training programmes lead to sub-par education, and education quality will not depend on individual teachers’ abilities.

Viv Ellis. The avatars are coming! But is it innovation in teacher education?  The spark that lit my interest was a discussion at Teachers College during the Educating the Teacher Educators research project in which colleagues left me dumbfounded when they showed me some of the US programmes exploiting…avatars and simulation technologies in pre-service teacher education… it was only a matter of time before one turned up here in England… 

 

UNTED STATES
AACTE
. December Federal Update Webinar [login required]

Chalkbeat. Four takeaways from Betsy DeVos’s summit on innovation in K-12 education  …concerns raised about state testing requirements and teacher certification rules.

Education Post. Teacher Shortages Demand More Rigorous Teacher Prep, Not Less  Many states have found solutions other than abbreviated or diluted undergraduate degrees to help prepare teachers fully and more quickly.

Education Week.
1) DeVos’ Team Tells N.Y., Florida, Other States They Have Work to Do on ESSA
2) Education Department’s Budget Includes Some Words Barred at the CDC  The budget asks for “$2 million for Supporting Effective Educator Development (SEED) to provide evidence-based professional development activities and prepare teachers and principals from nontraditional preparation and certification routes to serve in high-need [districts].”
3) Listen Up! State Teachers of the Year Share ‘Education Epiphanies’ in Podcasts  Indiana Teacher of the Year Jitka Nelson … is taking a sabbatical from the classroom to share expertise on teaching English-language learners with colleges of education… Her podcast explains how teachers can better teach their own ELL students.
4) Math Doesn’t Have to Suck. Here Are Three Ways to Make It Better  I got better at teaching math, mostly because I had to. I paid way too much money out of pocket to take a course at Bank Street College of Education on teaching math conceptually.
5) The Teaching Profession in 2017 (in ChartsStill, a researcher notes that the pace of inclusion has outpaced the number of teachers who are trained to teach students with special needs. 

Hechinger Report. Impatient with universities’ slow pace of change, employers go around them  In addition to long waits for programs to be approved by faculty and accrediting agencies, for example, many schools can’t find enough people qualified to teach computer science.

Inside Higher Ed. Enrollment Slide Continues, at Slower Rate College enrollments in the U.S. decline for a sixth straight year — although at a slower rate 

New York Times.
1) Graduate Students Escaped Tax Increases, but They Still Feel a Target on Their Backs
2) Teaching Activities for: ‘Uproar Over Purported Ban at C.D.C. of Words Like “Fetus”

The Atlantic. The Changing Landscape of Student Protest in Higher Education  The tax-bill overhaul mobilized a broad coalition of activists, offering first glimpses of what Republicans may be up against when they tackle financial-aid reform next year.

 

NEW YORK STATE
My Brother’s Keeper.
Changing the Narrative

NYSED News. Statement From State Education Department Commissioner MaryEllen Elia on Initial USDE ESSA Feedback

NYS Governor Cuomo. AN ACT to amend the education law, in relation to admission requirements for graduate-level teacher and educational leader programs for certified teachers already holding a graduate degree …SUCH GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION OR SUBSTANTIALLY EQUIVALENT ADMISSION EXAMINATION REQUIREMENT SHALL IN NO CASE APPLY TO CERTIFIED TEACHERS OR SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS WHO ALREADY HOLD A GRADUATE DEGREE.

 

NEW YORK CITY
ABC Eyewitness News
. Overcoming the hurdles of PE education in NYC schools Through a new initiative called PE Works, Mayor De Blasio has committed $100 million dollars to expanding PE curriculum and ensuring certified teachers are at every public school.

Chalkbeat.
1) In new study of school-district effectiveness, New York City falls just below national average  “Growth is way better than achievement,” said Douglas Ready, an education and public policy professor at Teachers College, Columbia University. “We know low-income students start school behind — the question is what do school districts do with the kids they get?”
2) Plans to shutter schools will force more than 400 New York City teachers to search for new jobs  Both the education department and United Federation of Teachers say they will work to match teachers to open positions. Every year, the city hires about 6,000 new teachers.

NY1. City continues to seek men of color to teach in schools  The city says it’s almost reached the goal. Three hundred and fifty male teachers of color have been hired. Five hundred and fifty more are in the pipeline.

New York Times. Carmen Fariña, Head of New York City Schools, Is Retiring  Amy Stuart Wells, a professor at Columbia University’s Teachers College … a member of the city’s school diversity advisory group, said Ms. Fariña’s department has paid more attention to the issue than past administrations… Aaron Pallas, a professor of sociology and education at Teachers College, said that … “She does believe a lot in the wisdom of practice, the idea that experience imparts knowledge about how to do this kind of work of educating children that one really can’t get other ways,”